Coach's Corner

Note: I am a newly certified RRCA Running Coach. Everything posted in "Coach's Corner" is my opinion. I am not a doctor or a dietician. As with anything on the internet, take everything with a grain of salt!

I didn't forget, I'm just feeling a bit under the weather (no worries, I still got in my 8 miles!).  AND my mom is in town for a visit!  I still have lots to update on my blog (I owe you another race report), and I'll do my best to get that in this week.

Question of the week: The week prior to a race, do you continue to train like normal?
Answer: (*Note: This answer assumes you actually want to *race* the distance, and not pace it as a training run.) In the case of a 5k or 10k, likely yes, you’d keep your training fairly normal. If it’s a new distance to you, you might want to consider keeping the intensity and mileage very low for up to 3 days prior. Also remember that even though a 5k might be a shorter distance for some, on race day it’ll still be considered high intensity, so you need to make sure the day prior isn’t also a high intensity day. For a half marathon, usually 7-10 days is considered an appropriate taper. While you will want to pull back your mileage, you will only pull back to about 2-3 weeks prior (i.e. if you ran your 8 mile long run 3 weeks prior, then that might be an appropriate distance to run the week before your half marathon). And for a marathon, the taper can be anywhere from 14-20 days. Again, it can all be very individual.

For those with multiple races on your schedule, you have to consider which race is your *A* race prior to deciding whether or not to taper. For instance, I am currently in marathon-training for a June 5 marathon. Even though I have a half-marathon in two weeks, I will still be running 18 miles this weekend. My focus is on the marathon. It might mean that I can’t run my absolute best at the half marathon (although I still intend to try), but I am keeping my distances in line with my ultimate race goal.

Tip of the week: NSAIDs!

NSAIDs = Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (i.e. Advil, Motrin, Aleve, etc)

This came up within the last week, and I just wanted to go ahead and address it.  But I’m not going to re-invent the wheel so I will just point you to *this article* that covers the bases.

With that said, I do NOT recommend ever taking NSAIDs prior to a run. If you’re in enough pain that you insist on needing them, you would probably be better taking the day off.

Motivational Quote of the Week:

Good things come slow - especially in distance running.
Bill Dellinger, Oregon Coach
Note: I am a newly certified RRCA Running Coach. Everything posted in "Coach's Corner" is my opinion. I am not a doctor or a dietician. As with anything on the internet, take everything with a grain of salt!

(Runners and coaches, please feel free to offer more input and/or feedback on these Coach's Corner posts.)