Coach's Corner

Note: I am a newly certified RRCA Running Coach. Everything posted in "Coach's Corner" is my opinion. I am not a doctor or a dietician. As with anything on the internet, take everything with a grain of salt!

I've only been doing Coach's Corner for under 3 months, but I'm already forgetting what I have and have not already covered.  Oh well, if I get repetitive, I'm sorry.

Question of the week: I completed my key race.  How do I maintain my miles?
Answer: As always, the famous answer - it depends.  But let's talk in general.  If you are at a 5k or 10k level, I would maintain the full distance at least once a week.  And maybe get in 2 other shorter runs during the week.  If you are at half marathon level, the numbers that race through my mind are 6 and 8.  If you have a long time between halves and are just looking for a very basic maintenance, I think getting in at least one 6-miler each week (with a couple other shorter runs) will keep you at a reasonable level, however, every few weeks, I would throw in an 8 just to keep the body used to pushing further. Obviously, this is just very general... if you're body can handle maintaining more miles and you have the desire to do more miles (and your body isn't at it's injury threshold), then go for it. 

Tip of the week: Treat your long runs like you would a race.  I know that I personally get lazy about how I treat my long runs.  I will prepare both nutritionally and mentally for a race for up to 3 days... but I don't give the same thought and preparation to a long run.  In my case, most of my races are 13.1, but my long runs are now 16-20 miles.  It's really pretty dumb of me to not treat the long run the same way.  I should be watching my hydration, making sure my carbs are sufficient, cutting the fat, watching the fiber, and mentally preparing for the effort ahead.  This does two things - first, makes sure that my body is prepared for what I'm about to put it through and second, makes sure that I get the most benefit out of my long run.  There's nothing worse than bonking during a long run - that can be physically and mentally devastating and can be a real de-motivator.

Motivational Quote of the Week:
(Sorry folks, I usually try to keep this beginner-focused, but I am in heavy marathon land, and I need this...)

If you feel bad at 10 miles, you’re in trouble. If you feel bad at 20 miles, you’re normal. If you don’t feel bad at 26 miles, you’re abnormal.
-Rob De Castella-
Note: I am a newly certified RRCA Running Coach. Everything posted in "Coach's Corner" is my opinion. I am not a doctor or a dietician. As with anything on the internet, take everything with a grain of salt!
(Runners and coaches, please feel free to offer more input and/or feedback on these Coach's Corner posts.)